Mostrando 7 resultados

Authority record
Família

Gallagher (family)

  • BHS00230
  • Família

The Gallagher and Whatmough families have histories that are closely intertwined. The Gallaghers migrated to Hamilton, Upper Canada in 1836, then lived in Rochester, New York for four years before settling in East Flamborough, Upper Canada. Two Whatmough men, Charles and Isaac, came to Upper Canada in 1858 and 1863, from the area around Manchester, England. Their parents and other family members seem to have moved back and forth between the two counties, with most settling in the Toronto/Burlington/Hamilton, Ontario area. The Gallaghers appear to have been farmers, in the main, while the Whatmoughs produced a number of architects and businessmen. Howard Gallagher (1897-1987) was active in the Flamborough and Waterdown Agricultural Society, Gordon Gallagher (1900-1985) was on the town planning committee which prepared Burlington’s first Official Plan, and served as deputy reeve and reeve of Burlington. Percy Gallagher (1901-1987) was a builder and developer who registered the White Oak Manor commercial and residential development survey, Plan 1124, in 1958. Charles T. Whatmough (1837-1885) opened a hardware business on King Street East in Toronto. Arthur Edwin Whatmough (1884-1971) was an architect who designed residential buildings in Toronto in the Arts and Crafts style until the Great Depression (1931). His son, Grant Alan Whatmough (1921-1999) was a naval architect and designer of private houses throughout southern Ontario. Isaac Abraham Whatmough (1842-1911), the second in his family to emigrate, worked in Toronto and Simcoe, where he joined the Norfolk Rifles, and spent some time in Chicago during the Civil War before returning to Toronto to work in his brother Charles’ hardware store.

Heit (family)

  • 015
  • Família
  • 1939 - present (in Sudbury, ON)

The Heit family first moved to the Garson, Ontario area shortly after Jacob "Jack" Heit (1914-1999) married Katherine "Kay" Kraft (1918-2009) on February 5, 1940 at Christ the King Church in Sudbury, Ontario. Prior to this time, both Jacob Heit and Katherine Kraft lived in Saskatchewan. The Heit's raised their family of five daughters, Diana, Janet, Marilyn, Kathy, and Susan in Garson, Ontario.

Stevens Family

  • 021
  • Família
  • 1902 - present (in Canada)

Robert Thomas Stevens [Roberto Tomaso Stefanizzi] was born in Cellara, Cosenza, Calabria, Italy on February 23, 1896 to Gaetano Stefanizzi and Gaetana Caliguiri. At the age of 6, he immigrated to Canada with his uncle Francesco Steffanzzi (aka Frank Stevens d. 1941 age 70) in 1902 while the rest of his family remained in Italy.

As a teenager during the first world war, Stevens operated a commissary at Nobel for the explosives plant employees. Stevens enjoyed being an entrepreneur and in 1918, he decided to venture into the film industry by opening his first theatre in Sudbury on Elm Street East. His theatre business thrived and over the years, Stevens expanded his business with the acquisition of additional theatres in Sturgeon Falls, Creighton Mine and Sault Ste. Marie. For a few years, Stevens also owned a theatre in Espanola. In August 1939, Stevens opened the large Regent Theatre on Elm Street in Sudbury. This theatre was well known for its size in Northeastern Ontario.

On December 4, 1923, Robert Stevens married Florence Boucher, a nurse originally from Whitefish, Ontario. The ceremony was held in Little Current, Ontario. They had six children; Joseph 'Robert' Guy (1924-1968), 'William' Alfred (1926-1988), 'Thomas' Joseph (1928-), Anne Marie (1930-2004, married name Ripley), John (1931?-), and Margaret Theressa (1934-).

During the second world war, Robert Stevens, along with many other Italian-born Canadians, was closely monitored by authorities. On August 24, 1940, Stevens was a patient at St. Joseph’s Hospital, suffering from a slight ailment. At 10 a.m. he was arrested on charges, under the Defence of Canada Regulations, for during August 14 to 20, 1940 “making statements intended to, or likely to, prejudice recruiting, training, discipline and administration of His Majesty’s forces,” and “making statements intended to, or likely to, cause disaffection to His Majesty.” He was escorted from his hospital room to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police headquarters for questioning. Afterwards, he was taken to the courthouse. Stevens was denied bail by the Magistrate and placed in a prison cell at the Sudbury District Jail until his trial three days later. Stevens plead guilty to the first charge and was fined $25. The second charge was dropped.

Robert Thomas Stevens became ill in January 1943 and passed away at St. Joseph's Hospital in Sudbury on February 13, 1943 at the age of 46.

Kantokoski (Koski), Koivula & Korpela Family

  • 016
  • Família
  • 1924 - present (in Canada)

The Kantokoski (Koski), Koivula, and Korpela families originated from Finland, but many members immigrated to Sudbury and other parts of Canada and the United States. These families inter-married over the years and have many shared descendants who settled in Sudbury.

Cooke family

  • BHS0006
  • Família
  • 1908-

Jacob Cooke was born in England in 1908 and emigrated to Canada in 1927, eventually settling in Burlington, Ontario. He worked as a carpenter’s helper for Pigott Construction (based in Hamilton, Ontario), and later specialized in the laying of hardwood floors. In 1935, he purchased a hand operated block making machine and began manufacturing concrete blocks in the evenings in a shed at the back of his home at 3 New Street (now 2109 New Street). The blocks were to be used as bases for Christmas trees that decorated Brant Street that Christmas season.

In 1937, he installed his first power-operated block machine. He purchased sand and gravel from Frank Scheer on St. Matthew’s Avenue. The demand for concrete blocks continued, so what had begun as a small cottage industry expanded to larger premises on St. Matthew’s Avenue in Aldershot, on lands purchased from George Filman. An adjacent 55 acre gravel pit provided the raw materials needed for the rapidly expanding operation.

Jacob Cooke purchased property in Aldershot, Oakville and Hamilton. He and employee Brant Coleman developed these properties and sold them to builders. In 1952, they developed the Glen Acres survey (Birdland) on the Filman property. The streets were named after birds in honour of William Filman, who used to have a bird sanctuary on the property. As the business expanded, Jacob Cooke purchased Joe DeLuca’s farm which became the site of the Cooke Business Park at 35 Plains Road E.

By 1953, J. Cooke Concrete Blocks was the largest producer of concrete blocks in Canada, each day producing enough to build 30 houses. The company was in operation around the clock and produced ten million eight-inch blocks per year. Jacob Cooke, retaining the land development company, sold the concrete block business in 1958. His son William (Bill) stayed on to manage the company with his brother Eugene Barrymore (Barry) as Plant Manager. The company was sold again in 1977 and 1998.

At the age of 62, Jacob Cooke visited family in Australia and decided to pursue opportunities there. Convincing his son Barry to join him, Jacob purchased, cleared and planted thousands of acres of land. Jacob Cooke died in Australia on 6 November 1976.

William Jacob Cooke (Bill) was born on Maple Avenue in Burlington on 1 June 1931. He and his brother Eugene Barrymore (Barry) attended Maplehurst Public School and Waterdown High School. Bill married Mary Elizabeth Gray (Bette) on 19 February 1955. Bill carried on the concrete block business after his father and brother moved to Australia, and also became involved with land development.

Some of the areas developed in Aldershot by the Cooke family are Birdland, Harbour Heights, Oaklands Estates, Fairwood Place West, and the Cooke Business Park adjacent to the former concrete block plant. The Cooke family developed over 800 residential lots in the Aldershot area. The property now known as Oaklands Estates on Burlington Bay was purchased by Jacob Cooke in the early 1950s and was later developed into a residential street by Bill. Bill lived at 160 Oaklands Park Court, the home he built there in 1959. In the Fairwood Acres survey on North Shore Boulevard, Bill named the streets after his children: Daryl, David, Lynn and Lee. Bill’s wife Mary died in 2000; he later married Louise Oates. He died in Burlington on 12 May 2005 at the age of 74.

Querney Family

  • 018
  • Família
  • 1937-present (in Sudbury, Ontario)

The Querney family first came to Sudbury, Ontario in 1937 from Toronto, Ontario due to Ernest T. Querney's new position as Manager of the Northern Electric Company Limited. Ernest & Marjorie Querney's son Alan Querney was born November 3, 1929 in Toronto.

In 1972, Bill Muirhead, a family friend, sold his family's business (Muirhead Stationers Limited) to Alan Querney. After Alan Querney's sons graduated university, they became co-owners of the business as well. Tom Querney (trained in economics, Chartered Accountant) became the general manager, Bill Querney (McMaster, Commerce Degree) the furniture warehouse manager, and John Querney (Laurentian, Commerce Degree) the sales manager of the office furniture section. Alan Querney retired around 2002 and Tom Querney became President of Muirheads.

In May 2005, the Querney family sold Muirheads to Grand & Toy, an OfficeMax company. They became the largest commercial office products company in Northern Ontario.

In 2009, John and Bill Querney decided to leave Grand & Toy and start their own office supply business. Querney's Office Plus opened to the public at 67 Elm Street (right beside the former location of Muirheads), Sudbury, Ontario on July 19, 2010 with the grand opening celebration on October 21, 2010.