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Pessoa/organização

Women's College Hospital. Department of Microbiology

  • WCH009
  • Entidade coletiva
  • 1920 -

In 1920 Women’s College Hospital established the Department of Laboratories and Dr. Vivian Marvin Laughlen (1920-1945) was appointed Chief of Laboratories. In 1945 Dr. Laughlen was followed by Dr. Eva Mader MacDonald (1945-1952); Dr. Alice Gray (1952-1980) and Dr. Ali H. Qizilbash (1980-1981). In 1981 the Department of Laboratories was divided into 2 new departments: the Department of Clinical Laboratories and the Department of Pathology. Dr. Kathleen Givan (1981-1992) was appointed Chief of Clinical Laboratories and was followed by Dr. Mary Vearncombe (1993-1999). In 1999 the name of the department was changed to the Department of Microbiology and Dr. Andrew Simor (1999- ) was named Chief of Microbiology.

Women's College Hospital. Division of Ophthalmology

  • WCH005
  • Entidade coletiva
  • 1914 -

The Division of Ophthalmology began at Women's College Hospital in the 1910s as a weekly eye clinic held in the Outpatient Department. In 1941, a Department of Ophthalmology was formally established with Dr. Mary Albertson (1941-1969) as its Chief. In the late 1950s the Department of Ophthalmology was re-established as a division of the Department of Surgery. Today, the Division of Ophthalmology is still active at Women's College Hospital.

Women's College Hospital. Department of Psychiatry

  • WCH008
  • Entidade coletiva
  • 1961 -

The Department of Psychiatry at Women's College Hospital was established in 1961 under Dr. Lois Plumb (1961-1973), Chief of Psychiatry. Prior to its establishment, the hospital retained a psychiatrist on staff through the Department of Medicine during the 1950s. Following Dr. Plumb, Dr. A.G. Swayze (1973-1974) was appointed Acting Chief of Psychiatry in 1973 and was followed by Dr. G. Anthony Ives (1974-1984), Dr. Howard E. Book (1984-1995), Dr. Peter Nynkowski (1996), Dr. Barbara Dorian (1997-1999) and Dr. Anthony Levitt (2006- ).

Wilfrid Laurier University. Faculty of Science

  • U258
  • Entidade coletiva
  • 1991 -

The Faculty of Science at Wilfrid Laurier University was founded in 2000, when the Faculty of Arts and Sciences partitioned into distinct faculties of Arts and Science. The Faculty consists of the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Kinesiology and Physical Education, Mathematics, Physics and Computer Science, Psychology and the Health Sciences program. Deans of the Faculty of Science have been Dr. Arthur Szabo (2000-2007), Dr. Deb MacLatchy (2007-2009), and Dr. Paul Jessop (2009- present).

The Faculty is predominantly housed in the Science Building which was officially opened in 1995. Eventually the Science Research Centre (opened in 2004) was added between the Science and Bricker Academic Buildings. The Research Centre is a dedicated research building for faculty and students.

In 2000, the Faculty of Science mandate was as follows:
“Laurier’s Faculty of Science is dedicated to collaboration between and beyond its six departments. In that spirit, the Faculty offers selected high quality programs with homes in Biology, Chemistry, Kinesiology & Physical Education, Mathematics, Physics and Computer Science and Psychology. Its programs are contemporary and competitive, designed to attract the highest quality students, and to provide them with a stimulating education and thorough preparation for employment or further studies. That Faculty holds the advance of scientific knowledge as one of its key values, and as such is committed to sustaining a supportive climate for research in the pure, social and applied sciences. The Faculty’s spirit of shared enterprise is highly valued by its members.”

Wilfrid Laurier University. Faculty of Social Work

  • U257
  • Entidade coletiva
  • 1966-

The Waterloo Lutheran University Graduate School of Social Work was founded in 1966 with a curriculum based on clinical practice as well as community organization practice. Students specialized in one of five concentrations: community development, social planning, social administration, research, or individuals, families and social groups. The first class graduated in 1968, the same year that the Graduate School of Social Work was accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. In 1974, the name of the program was changed to the Faculty of Social Work to reflect the expansion into part-time, continuing education and undergraduate social welfare courses (offered in the Faculty of Arts and Science). In 1981, the Faculty of Social Work created an undergraduate Social Welfare Option, considered to be a minor.

The Doctor of Social Work program was established in 1987, making it the first doctoral program at Wilfrid Laurier University.

By 1988 the Faculty had moved from the seminary to the Peters building and then to the Aird building before moving to the St. Jerome’s Duke Street building in 2006. This Laurier Kitchener campus was a 12 million dollar conversion from historic landmark to professional school.

The first Dean of the Faculty of Social Work was Sheldon L. Rahn (1966-1968), followed by Francis J. Turner (1969-1979), Sherman Merle (1980-1983), Shankar A. Yelaja (1983-1993), Jonnah Hurn Mather (1994-2001), Luke J. Fusco (2001-2006), Leslie Cooper (2006-2009), and Nicholas Coady (2011-).

Waterloo Lutheran Seminary

  • 075
  • Entidade coletiva
  • 1911-

Waterloo Lutheran Seminary (WLS) officially opened on October 30, 1911 in Waterloo, Ontario in a house located on five acres of land donated by the City of Waterloo. The first class consisted of four students and one full-time faculty member, Ottomar Lincke. Lincke would also serve as the first executive officer until 1914. In 1924, Waterloo College was established, providing courses in post-secondary education. The following year, the Seminary and Waterloo College affiliated with the University of Western Ontario (UWO) allowing students to earn an accredited degree. Women were allowed to attend to Waterloo College beginning in 1929.

In 1960 Waterloo College ended its affiliation with the University of Western Ontario and became an independent, degree granting institution called Waterloo Lutheran University that operated alongside the Seminary.

The current Seminary building was dedicated on October 20th, 1963. In 1973 Waterloo Lutheran University became a provincially-funded, secular institution and was renamed Wilfrid Laurier University. The Lutheran Church was no longer responsible for the operating the University but the Waterloo Lutheran Seminary remained a federated college of Wilfrid Laurier University.

In the 1980s, the Waterloo Lutheran Seminary gained full accreditation status in the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada. In 1994, a Doctor of Ministry degree was added. The year 2010 saw the creation of the Kanata Centre for Worship and Global Song, which seeks to bridge the cultural gap between developed and less developed countries. Currently, the Seminary offers a variety of diploma, master’s and doctoral programs, as well as a Bachelor of Arts in Christian Studies and Global Citizenship.

St. John the Evangelist Catholic Youth Organization

  • 030
  • Entidade coletiva
  • January 1944 - June 1980

St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church was built in Garson, Ontario in 1913-1914. Prior to this time, mass was celebrated in Garson by a visiting priest from Ste. Anne's Parish in Sudbury with the first mass in Garson celebrated in 1906 by Reverend G.S. Lebel. In 1935 the mission of St. John's, which included the towns of Garson and Falconbridge, became a parish and Reverend John P. Coghlan was named the first Parish Priest, serving until 1964. In March of 1950 the original St. John's church succumbed to fire and another church was immediately built in its place, with the first mass being held there on December 17, 1950.

The Catholic Youth Organization (C.Y.O.), affiliated with St. John's, was established in January 1944 due to the efforts of Father A.J. Sullivan. The C.Y.O.'s first meeting had twenty people in attendance and by 1946 had grown to include approximately fifty members, who were divided into 'junior' and 'senior' groups. It was a popular unit within the church and many events and programs were held for the benefit of the members. Events included dances, debates, quiz nights, holiday parties, roller skating parties and tobogganing outings. The C.Y.O. also took great interest in athletics and took part in a bowling league and a baseball league, as well as organized hikes, skiing trips and dart tournaments for members. By April 1946 the C.Y.O. was running its own news bulletin, which was used to relay gossip, local news and events within St. John's Parish and to advertise upcoming parties and events being held by the C.Y.O. The C.Y.O. remained in existence until June 1980.

The editorial staff for the years 1946-1947 were:
Editor: Lil Scagnetti
Assistant Editor: Mike Dudowich
Typist: Diane Scagnetti [Di Scagnetti/Diane Dellelce]
Printer: Abele Crisante
Sports Editor: George Morin
Poetry Department: Marg Lachapelle
Senior Reporter: Theresa Moreau, Claire Daoust
Junior Reporter: Rose Devuono, Bea Laliberte
Deliveries: Stan Hyduk
Social Editor [April 1946]: T. Egan

The Canadian Bank of Commerce, Sudbury Branch No. 1335

  • 032
  • Entidade coletiva
  • 1929-1961

The Canadian Bank of Commerce was first established on May 15, 1867 in Toronto, Ontario. Through amalgamations with regional banks, it grew to include branches across the country. With additional acquisitions in the 1920's, the bank became one of the strongest branch networks in Canada with well over 700 locations by 1929.

In 1936 the Canadian Bank of Commerce was the first bank in Canada to establish a personal loans department. At first, the bank would only issue loans, for a maximum of $1,000, in the Toronto and Hamilton areas. After the success of this pilot project, loans were extended to Canadians across the country.

During the second world war, the Canadian Bank of Commerce, along with other banks across Canada, assisted the government with the implementation of Victory Loans and War Ration coupons. The Victory Loan campaigns raised around $12 billion for the war effort, with almost three million Canadians buying war loan bonds. With the war ration coupons, banks became responsible for the accounting of food ration coupons in March, 1943 and gasoline ration coupons in April, 1944. The federal government first introduced ration coupons in April, 1942 for gasoline (until Aug 1945) and for certain food products in June, 1942 as a way of insuring equitable distribution of these supplies because of an acute shortage during the war. (Sugar - June 1942-1947, tea - 1942-Sept 1944, coffee - 1942-Sept 1944, butter - Dec 1942 -June 1947, meat - May 1943-March 1947, preserves - Dec 1943-1947, and in some areas evaporated milk - Dec 1943-1947.) After the initial year, the government decided banks in Canada were in a better position to handle the accounting aspect of the ration coupons and the banks agreed, provided they were able to limit the amount of paperwork involved. Dealers such as jobbers and brokers, wholesalers, creamery and cheese factories, importers of tea and coffee, retailers whose normal monthly gross sales in food exceeded $5,000, as well as businesses which served meals including the rationed goods, such as hotels, restaurants, and hospitals, were required to conduct ration bank accounts. With the ration bank accounts, these dealers and food server businesses would deposit and withdraw ration stamps in the same manner as financial accounts. Each ration product required a separate account for these businesses. When ration supplies were needed, a business would simply write a cheque in the amount of the ration stamps required from their specific product ration account. In turn, when customers purchased a rationed product, they would hand the business the required number of stamps and they would then deposit them into the specific ration accounts for their next purchase from their suppliers (both the businesses and the public were still required to pay cash for their rationed products along with the ration stamps.)

After the war, the Canadian Bank of Commerce increased their holdings to include branches in newly created suburbs and in 1954, along with the rest of the banks in Canada, began to offer mortgages for newly constructed homes. Prior to this time, all banks were barred from the mortgage business since 1871, leaving life insurance companies to offer the majority of mortgages to the public.

On June 1st 1961, the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce was formed through the merger of The Canadian Bank of Commerce and the Imperial Bank of Canada. The merger occurred due to both banks growth in the resource industry. The Imperial Bank of Canada was unable to keep up with the increasing needs of its resource industry clients and in an attempt to meet these needs and to ward off a possible buyout by a foreign bank, a new, larger bank was formed by the merger.

The Sudbury Branch of the Bank of Commerce first opened on June 22, 1929. Located on the corner of Elm and Elgin in the former Sterling Bank of Canada building, this bank became the eighth to locate to Sudbury (The Sterling Bank of Canada 1905-1924, opened January 30, 1909 in Sudbury. This bank merged with the Standard Bank of Canada in 1924 and the Standard Bank of Canada merged with the Canadian Bank of Commerce in 1928). The Town of Sudbury Building Permits record a H.R. Sheldon for Sterling Bank applying for a building permit on July 1, 1918 for 151 Elm Street. The building material included 80,000 bricks, 1,100 yards plastering, 1,000 cubic feet stone work, and 2,900 cubic feet concrete. This branch served as the main office in Sudbury until a larger branch was opened at the corner of Cedar and Lisgar Streets. As the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, the Elm and Elgin branch merged with the Cedar Street branch on October 24, 1997, leaving the Elm and Elgin Street location vacant.

The Wartime Prices and Trade Board

  • CGSA-AC0099
  • Entidade coletiva
  • 1939 - 1951

The Wartime Prices and Trade Board is a former Canadian government agency, established on September 3, 1939, by the Mackenzie King government, under the authority of the War Measures Act, in the Department of Labour responsible for price controls and inflation control. The board was abolished in 1951, upon the lapse of the Continuation of Transitional Measures Act, 1947.

University of British Columbia. Faculty of Law

  • AC006
  • Entidade coletiva
  • 1945-

The University of British Columbia's Faculty of Law opened in September 1945. Prior to this, law students in British Columbia articled for three years and attended lectures given by the legal profession at the Vancouver Law School (V.L.S.) operated by the Law Society of British Columbia. After lengthy discussions a joint Law Society/UBC committee was struck in July 1945 to submit recommendations and plans for the establishment of a Faculty of Law. The University's Board of Governors and Senate approved the committee's recommendations late in August. The faculty's original staff consisted of George F. Curtis (professor and dean), Frederick Read and Alfred Watts. The Faculty was housed in converted army huts on campus and would remain there until 1952. Student enrollment increased significantly following World War II. By the early 1950s the Faculty had outgrown its accommodations and Dean Curtis began plans for a permanent Faculty of Law Building. Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent opened the new building in 1952. Curtis was succeeded in 1971 as Dean by Albert J. McClean. The Faculty continued to grow throughout the seventies, again raising the need for a larger building. In 1975 the existing building was remodelled and a new addition constructed. This new structure was completed in 1976 and named the George F. Curtis Building. In 1985 Chinese Legal Studies was added to the East Asian programme through a
joint U.B.C./Peking University exchange of legal scholars and graduate students. That same year also saw the establishment of a Cooperative Project in Law and Computers with IBM Canada.

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